Category Archives: Card Games

Guillotine

guillotine box

Sometimes the theme of a game seems totally arbitrary; the theme does nothing to guide, instruct, or illuminate game play. Guillotine (Wizards of the Coast, 1998), however, is not one of those games; the game play fits precisely with the theme, and does so in a humorous, fun, and slightly bawdy way.

In Guillotine, players are rival executioners in revolutionary France vying for heads. Heads vary in terms of point value, and some heads are more valuable if they are collected along with particular other heads.

There are three rounds, each representing a day of executions, in which 12 “nobles” (see pics below) are lined up for execution, beginning at a cardboard gallows. Players have a hand of “Action” cards, and are free to play one at the beginning of each turn. Action cards can do many things, such as rearrange the lineup, pull nobles out of the lineup, add nobles to it, allow the player to steal or swap a head from another basket, etc. After they have played the action card or passed, they then collect whatever noble is next in line for execution, and then draw another action card.

guillotine cards

It’s the use of action cards that make the game so much fun; since heads that have been collected are on public display, face up in front of each executioner, all players can gauge each others’ worth and play action cards with that in mind.

This is a fun and relatively quick game, and it’s small enough to travel with. It’s recommended for ages 12 and up, but if the sometime risque humor is not an issue (chances are it’s too subtle to be easily noticed), it can be played by ages 8 and over. The humor makes it a great ice breaker, where players may not know each other well, and I recommend it for light-gaming situations, or perhaps as a pastime when waiting for some bigger event.

Buy Guillotine on Amazon!

Advertisements

Titan: The Arena

Titan arena box

Titan: The Arena (Avalon Hill, 1997; aka Colossal Arena, Fantasy Flight Games, 2008) is another of my all time favorites because of the uncertainty of outcome until very late in the game, the interactivity of the players, and the theme.

Titan: The Arena (not to be confused with its larger namesake, Titan) is a card game in which 8 fantasy creatures, each with specific powers, are battling in an imaginary arena. They battle for 8 rounds, and each round one creature is eliminated. Players place bets on one creature during each round, and then place numbered cards on each creature to represent relative power for that round. Once each creature has a number card, the round is over and the lowest numbered creature exits, so all the bets that had been placed on it throughout the game are nullified. By the end of the last round, there is one creature left standing. Whichever player has the most value of bets invested in that creature, wins.

titan arena play diagram

The beauty of this game is that each player has to simultaneously prop up some creatures while trying to undermine others, while betting accordingly. The chaos introduced by each creature’s special ability is especially fun; whichever player has the most bets cumulatively invested in any given creature gets “control” over that creature, and may invoke that creatures special ability. These abilities may prove critical late in the game! For example the owner of the Hydra can place two cards at once. If the he or she finds theirĀ  creature with a low card, they could, on one turn, put a higher number under the Hydra and a lower number on another creature. The owner of the Dragon has the ability to destroy any card in play, so what the Hydra just did the Dragon might undo. The variations are as endless as the cleverness of the players.

I would recommend this game to just about anyone who is old enough to understand the rules. It’s recommended for 8 and up, but I wouldn’t expect anyone under 10 to really understand how to deal with the contingencies.

The game play makes it essentially a very interesting card game; the theme is secondary. People with no interest in the theme should be able to ignore it and enjoy the game for what it is! Those who do like the theme will find it very easy to imagine the arena setting, manipulations of the creatures, and invocation of powers.

Note: Titan: The Arena is out of print, but has been replaced by Colossal Arena, which has new art and 4 extra creatures. This review is for the version I know, but can be safely transferred to the new one.

Buy Colossal Arena on amazon!